Facebook Pages for Small Businesses

Running a small business can be tough. I know, I have run a few small businesses in the past and you are always watching the pennies. Sometimes business is good, sometimes it’s abysmal and you always have a to-do list (or a should do list) as long as your arm.

Making correct use of the Internet can really help boost your business by doing such things as drive customers to your premises and improve your business reputation, but many small business owners believe that having a Facebook page alone is enough to get their business seen and optimised online and don’t want to fork out for a professionally made website.

That is a big mistake.

A Facebook page is great as part of your online strategy, but it should never replace a professional website and here are some reasons why:

  • Website credibility aids your SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) ranking, meaning more people will find your business faster on the Internet.
  • Whilst a Facebook page is a great way to add options to how customers can interact with you, you are likely eliminating almost half your potential customers if you limit your business to only a Facebook page.
  • Only a small percent (1%-5%) of people who have liked your Facebook page will see your updates.
  • Facebook pages do not offer enough functionality – particularly e-commerce.
  • You risk your account being deleted with Facebook. You have to follow their constantly revised terms of service.
  • Facebook favours BIG BRANDS that are able to give grand displays which draw in hundreds of thousands of likes.
  • A Facebook page alone is very weak. A weak or low online presence translates to a low search engine ranking. Compounding this ranking is the indistinguishability of Facebook pages.
  • Facebook creates negative brand images from people indiscriminately posting negative comments on the your business page.
  • Your competitors can target the people visiting your Facebook page and tempt them away.
  • Research shows that people choose to click on a website link over a Facebook page link.
  • By having a professional website, a certain level of trust is built subconsciously and confidence is instilled in the customer.
  • Anyone can have a Facebook page and Facebook pages can often be suspicious and related to criminality. Only credible and professional businesses will have invested time and money into a business website.
  • Customers search on Google and not Facebook when looking for products, services and establishments. Facebook pages do not rank well in Google search – websites do.
  • When searching for businesses, the customer will be returned many identical Facebook pages to choose from. So, without a website, you will receive no preferential ranking.
  • You have full control with a website. This includes your own domain name, where it is hosted, the design, visitor rights, etc.
  • A website enables you to capture customer data such as emails.
  • A website is much more conducive to telling your business story in a clear and engaging manner.
  • A website is your hub for everything.
  • Website analytics are more comprehensive than Facebook page analytics.
  • Facebook pages deliver a form of information that is not useful for your audience or customers.
  • Facebook has too much control of your page relating to content and marketing.
  • A Facebook page requires too much time to manage. Regular posts and changes are required to keep your Facebook page even slightly visible.
  • With a website, your statistics are private. You don’t have to share how many views the website has got, unique visitors, etc. With Facebook, everyone can see this data and compare you to your competitors.
  • With a website, you can design your business branding goals and colours.
  • The best strategy is ALWAYS to have a multi-channel approach, anchoring all your efforts with a well built and informative website.
  • A dedicated website has Google on its side. A Facebook page doesn’t provide the same comprehensive SEO control of a dedicated website.
  • When Facebook users want to find out more information about your business they go to your website. This bears itself out in Google Analytics reports.
  • A dedicated website enables you to completely control your brand and acts as the main hub on the web where interested, potential customers can go for all the information they are looking for.
  • A website enables you to tailor your content to the exact kind of key phrases and keywords your customers are searching for. A critical component of any business acquisition strategy.
  • Facebook policy changes can be frustrating. Ultimately, Facebook makes decisions that best suit its own business objectives. With your own website you have full control.
  • Your business branding is subordinate to the blue Facebook brand. Your content, including offers, promotions and updates must stay within the guidelines established by Facebook.
  • Facebook places heavy emphasis on user feedback when developing their algorithms, interface and apps. This means that change is always just around the corner, which is not a stable basis on which to build a strategy.
  • It’s a Facebook page and will never give the complete brand experience that a dedicated website will.
  • A Facebook page does not do enough to establish respectability for your business, although can be acceptable for a small start-up business.
  • (2021) 88% of users say they wouldn’t return to a website after having a bad user experience. 70% of online businesses that fail do so because of bad usability. Only 55% of companies currently conduct any UX testing. If someone is not logged into Facebook when clicking on your Facebook page, the user experience is terrible.
  • If, when searching on Google, your Facebook pages actually appears in the Google search listings, the Facebook page will provide a poor user experience unless the person is already logged into Facebook.
  • Competitors Can Advertise On Your Page. What’s worse, your competitors can specifically target your FB Page fans based on their profile and browsing history.
  • Having your own website adds credibility to your business.
  • Google gives greater SEO importance on having your own website. Facebook pages do not rank as high in search results and there is nothing you can do about it as Facebook controls everything.
  • The majority of people search on Google when looking for something on the Internet, not Facebook.
  • For a business to thrive, it needs to be individualised and distinguishable from the rest. Your business website is crucial to building the brand for your small business.
  • Google Analytics can’t be used by Facebook pages. Google Analytics allows you to perform market research with minimal effort and to constantly analyse customer trends & identify shortcomings.
  • A website helps your organic ranking (as websites ranks higher than Facebook pages) and allows you to optimise SEO and improve your ranking further by creating content.
  • Having a website allows you to prioritise your information based on what your customers want to see first, giving your customers and experience they will remember and come back for.

So, there you have it. A few reasons why you should consider a website for your small business. MrTESOL.com is a small business dedicated to helping other small businesses get optimised online. Get in contact today and let’s discuss getting your business website made. Over prices are low and our service is top notch!

I hope you have a great year.

Best,

Robert

Digital Marketing Manager at MrTESOL.com

Presentations 2


English Skill: Ending a Presentation

Keeping with the theme of presentations, imagine you have just given an amazing presentation, your use of English (so far) has been great, but now it’s time to bring the presentation to a close. This part of a presentation can often be difficult as you don’t want your audience to feel cut short or unsure as to if you have actually concluded your presentation or not. Your audience will often remember the last things you say in your presentation, so making sure that you don’t just kind of fizzle out at the end is important.

Take a look at the image below. You will find some common phrases to end a presentation in a convincing and professional manner. 

Common phrases to bring your presentation to an end.

Common phrases to bring your presentation to an end.

Have you got a presentation in English coming up soon? What do you find most difficult during a presentation?

Mr TESOL.

Restaurants 3

English Skill: Making an Invitation

Situation: You’ve been having a good week at work and are just about to take your lunch break when you see one of your colleagues standing outside the entrance to the company. You are feeling upbeat and generous, so decide to invite your colleague to lunch/dinner. Take a look at the related English phrases below to see how common phrases can be used to make dinner/lunch invitations.

Making Invitations

How long are the lunch/dinner breaks at your company? Do you feel they should be longer? In some countries, lunch breaks can last for as long as three hours!

Mr TESOL.

Restaurants 2

English Skill: Ordering from the Bar

Situation: You and some colleagues/friends are enjoying an evening out at a local bar/restaurant. You are all having a look at the drinks menu in order to see what is available and to decide what you will have to drink. Take a look at the related phrases you could use to discuss what’s on the menu and to speak with the waiter when he arrives to take your order.

Restaurants 2

Any questions? 🙂

Mr TESOL.

Conversations 3

English Skill: Starting a Discussion

Here are a couple of situations for you. Do either of them sound a little familiar?

  1. You are out doing a bit of shopping and you see an old colleague/friend. You decide to approach him/her and start a discussion with the intention of finding out what they are doing these days, how their family is, etc.
  1. You need to speak with a work colleague who is full of the joys of spring having just returned from holiday. It’s time to start a discussion with him/her and explain what it is you need/want from him/her.

Although starting a discussion should be a piece of cake, doing so can often be more difficult than first anticipated. You don’t want to come across super awkward or sound unnaturally weird and you certainly don’t want to be a pain, so here are some common phrases you may want to employ next time you have the opportunity to practise a bit of conversation starting English!

Starting a Discussion

Starting a Discussion

What phrases have you used to start a discussion recently? Do you think you will use any of the expressions above?

Presentations 2


English Skill: Ending a Presentation

Keeping with the theme of presentations, imagine you have just given an amazing presentation, your use of English (so far) has been great, but now it’s time to bring the presentation to a close. This part of a presentation can often be difficult as you don’t want your audience to feel cut short or unsure as to if you have actually concluded your presentation or not. Your audience will often remember the last things you say in your presentation, so making sure that you don’t just kind of fizzle out at the end is important.

Take a look at the image below. You will find some common phrases to end a presentation in a convincing and professional manner. 

Common phrases to bring your presentation to an end.

Common phrases to bring your presentation to an end.

Have you got a presentation in English coming up soon? What do you find most difficult during a presentation?

Mr TESOL.

Presentations 1

English Skill: Describing Visuals During a Presentation 

 Do you ever have to give presentations in English as part of your job or in front of friends and family? As part of my teaching career I have given many presentations in English and I know how nerve-racking it can sometimes be – and English is my native tongue!

Visual aids that you often encounter in (Powerpoint) presentations, such as pie charts, graphs, bar graphs, bullet points, boxes, etc. can often be challenging for non-native English speakers to refer to and you may be tempted to just talk about them without properly referencing them or using the correct language, or worse still – just ignore them! In order for your audience to easily follow your presentation and to allow you yourself to come across more professionally, here are some common English phrases that can be used to help describe various visual aids during a presentation.

Describing visual aids

Describing visual aids

  • Do you give presentations in English? What to you find most challenging?

Mr TESOL.

Conversations 2

English Skill: Keeping a Conversation Flowing

Have you ever been in the difficult situation of having (or trying to have) a conversation with someone who, for whatever reason, just does not want to contribute to the conversation? Perhaps he/she is a little bit shy or maybe they are not confident enough in their use of English, but either way it doesn’t make things any easier and those quiet times when the conversation dries up can be awkward! Well, next time you find yourself in a similar situation, why not try to help things out by incorporating a few useful English phrases? The phrases below are common English phrases that native English speakers often use to help keep a conversation flowing. The phrases don’t need to be used just in awkward situations and are equally suitable to help along a nice discussion with someone such as a friend.

Common phrases to help keep a conversation flowing.

Common phrases to help keep a conversation flowing.

  • Have you ever been involved in a conversation that included some uneasy silences? What did you do?
  • What other phrases might you use to keep a conversation flowing with someone? Let me know your thoughts by posting a comment!

Mr TESOL.

Conversations 1

English Skill: Ending a Discussion

It’s great to be able to have a conversation with someone in English, but sometimes it can be difficult to find a way to end it. You just keep on chatting away, unsure of what you could say to finally end the conversation and not offend the person you are speaking with.

Take a look at the situation below. You have probably experienced it (or something like it) before. The picture that follows it provides you with some common phrases that native English speakers often use to end a conversation.  Maybe next time you find yourself in a similar situation, you could try using some of them!

Situation: You are walking down the street in your city/town and you see an old friend who you have not seen for a while. You approach him/her, engage in conversation and chat about family, work, friends, etc. After a chatting for a little while, you really need to get on with your day, but how do you end the conversation? Take a look at the picture below to find some common expressions to end a discussion (politely) with someone.

Common phrases to end a discussion.

Common phrases to end a discussion.

Are there any other phrases to end a discussion that you can think of? Do you sometimes find it difficult ending a discussion?

Mr TESOL.